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Sunday, 24 June 2012

Are Your Sales People Hunters or Farmers? You Need Both!

My old sales mentor, the famed Phil Copp, Sage of Wythenshawe, was the embodiment of the classic salesman, unwilling to accept defeat and always ready to look at another innovative approach to solving a problem for his customer.

Phil was meticulous in his planning and knew every week precisely where he was going, who he was visiting and why.

I know that the world has changed significantly since those days and the dramatic developments in communication online have led to equally dramatic changes in marketing and sales methodology. 

There is no doubt that email, websites, LinkedIn, Twitter et al are fine and frankly have become essential components of business development today.  However it is still vital, perhaps more than ever, to meet your customers face to face, eyeball to eyeball, and build a relationship that cannot be done electronically.

Phil Copp would have loved today’s world and would have exploited it mercilessly to his advantage.  He would have been equally certain that he needed to make a specific number of calls at regular intervals to ensure that the personal relationships were kept warm and productive.

The key to his success was that he understood the difference between the sales hunter and the sales farmer, and most unusually, he combined the two because he understood that the world doesn’t stand still and like it or not, customers move on for many reasons.

He knew that, on average, he would make around 30 valid sales calls a week and that meant not just putting his head round the door and saying (metaphorically) “Owt today?”

On that basis he then divided his annual total of calls into 70% existing customers and 30% prospecting.  He would then plan the calling schedule for each week based on those ratios.

All very simple and nothing new, but he stuck to it religiously and consequently grew his part of the business significantly.

It was a combination of great relationships built on trust, and vast experience which led to his unsurpassed expertise and domain knowledge.

The problem in many cases is that often people on sales have been classified as either hunters or farmers and never the twain shall meet except to complain about each other’s activities,

The very title of Business Development implies searching for new outlets  and then presumably handing them over to someone else who will develop the relationship without any thought as to whether this can be done effectively.

Great sales people realise that it is far better to research the market, identify the potential, go to see them and open the door to building a relationship.  It’s not easy but it is the most satisfying part of any sales person’s business life.

Hunters or farmers?  You need to be both!

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